Nausea 360

 
 

People have always been fascinated by the ability to record and capture a moment in time for later viewing. Generally, these attempts have been superficial, only capturing a fraction of a scene. With the advent of 360 photography we can now record the entirety of an environment. Devices like Google Cardboard allow us to immerse ourselves in the recording by overtaking our sense of sight. Unfortunately, this augmentation of a single sense can create a feeling of nausea or motion sickness. This nausea occurs when the information collected by our various senses seem to contradict one another. Because 360 are purely observational, i.e. they only track our rotational motion and not our motion through space, this nausea has become an extremely prevalent problem that deters many would-be consumers from taking part.

Nausea 360 is an attempt to quantify and represent the nausea inducing effects of popular 360 videos found on Youtube by tracking the change in velocity and acceleration of the camera in space.

 
 
 
 1. Unwrapped 360 Image An example of what the user would see while viewing a 360 video of a person walking through the Louvre with Google Cardboard device.   

1. Unwrapped 360 Image An example of what the user would see while viewing a 360 video of a person walking through the Louvre with Google Cardboard device.

 

 3. Image Difference  The same frame compared to the next ten consecutive frames.  By calculating the difference between each frame, we get an image where that isolates the intensity and direction of motion represented by white pixels.   

3. Image Difference

The same frame compared to the next ten consecutive frames.

By calculating the difference between each frame, we get an image where that isolates the intensity and direction of motion represented by white pixels.

 

 5. Derivatives  To be able to compare the motion of one video to another, we take the first derivative to calculate the change in velocity and the second derivative to calculate the change in acceleration.   

5. Derivatives

To be able to compare the motion of one video to another, we take the first derivative to calculate the change in velocity and the second derivative to calculate the change in acceleration.

 

 
 2. Flattened 360 Image A full 360 degree panorama of an image from the same video flattened to be viewed in its entirety.   

2. Flattened 360 Image A full 360 degree panorama of an image from the same video flattened to be viewed in its entirety.

 

 4. Average Brightness  Choose an area of the image that only contains no independently moving objects (e.g. walls not people) and take the average brightness.  This results in a metric that allows us to compare the motion between frames in the same video.   

4. Average Brightness

Choose an area of the image that only contains no independently moving objects (e.g. walls not people) and take the average brightness.

This results in a metric that allows us to compare the motion between frames in the same video.

 

 6. Visualize  To visualize and exaggerate this motion, we projected the video onto a sphere and mapped its change in velocity to scale and its change in acceleration to vertical motion.   

6. Visualize

To visualize and exaggerate this motion, we projected the video onto a sphere and mapped its change in velocity to scale and its change in acceleration to vertical motion.

 

Advisor: Andrew Witt

Partner: Adam M Pere